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Kentucky Air Guard supports aeromedical training
CINCINNATI, OHIO -- Maj. Samuel AiKele (left), an anesthesiologist from the 99th Medical Group at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., and Master Sgt. James Woods, a respiratory therapist from the 60th Surgical Operations Squadron at Travis Air Force Base, Calif., perform cardio-pulmonary resuscitation on a medical-training mannequin Feb. 11, 2010, while flying over southern Ohio aboard a Kentucky Air Guard C-130. The Airmen were participating in a two-week Critical Care Air Transport Team course designed to provide medical personnel with total immersion in the care of severely injured patients. Ground training and simulated-flight training are conducted at the University of Cincinnati, one of four Air Force Centers for Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills (CSTARS) nationwide, but the final day of instruction is provided during actual flight. The Kentucky Air Guard's 165th Airlift Squadron began providing C-130s to use as a CSTARS training platform in 2009. (U.S. Air Force by Maj. Dale Greer)
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Kentucky Air Guard provides in-flight realism for aeromedical training program

Posted 3/20/2010   Updated 4/27/2012 Email story   Print story

    


by Maj. Dale Greer
123rd Airlift Wing Public Affairs


3/20/2010 - KENTUCKY AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- The Kentucky Air National Guard is adding a dose of in-flight realism to the aeromedical training of U.S. Air Force personnel at the University of Cincinnati.

Those personnel attend a two-week Critical Care Air Transport Team course that's designed to provide doctors, nurses and respiratory therapists with total immersion in the care of severely injured patients.

The course features ground training and simulated in-flight training at University of Cincinnati Hospital, but on the final day of class, students put their training to work with an airborne exercise aboard a Kentucky Air Guard C-130 over the skies of southern Ohio.

"There's nothing like the sights, sounds and smells -- the visceral experience -- of being in the back of a C-130 when you're trying to care for critically injured patients," said Col. Jay Johannigman, a medical doctor, Air Force reservist and chief of the Division of Trauma and Critical Care at the University of Cincinnati. "We want our students to experience what that's like."

The University of Cincinnati program is one of four Air Force Centers for Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills nationwide. The Kentucky Air Guard's 165th Airlift Squadron began providing C-130s to use as a CSTARS training platform in 2009.



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